In the studio

There’s something about September in the studio. With the door open to the woods outside, the air feels different. Like the coming of fall. Full of hope and refreshing cool breezes. One of my favorite collectors left the studio yesterday with a captivating large artwork for a new space. As always, I’m humbled when collectors knock on my door for more. And, I’m on fire to do more…

Divergent Images @callowayart.com

Dave48x36acrylic_on_canvas

Dave, 48×36 painting on canvas by Washington, DC artist Leslie Nolan

My solo exhibit at Calloway Fine Art & Consulting is now available online for viewing and for purchasing:

http://callowayart.com/divergent-impulses

You’ll find 15 artworks as well as a video featuring a visit with me behind the scenes in my studio.

 

 

 

 

The Making of a Painting – Leon

 

An artwork starts with an idea – what to convey.  Since I strive for ambiguity, I think Leon (above) achieved that goal.

Then decisions about how best to convey that idea.  In my case, it comes down to paint on canvas, color choices, close up or full body image of the figure, placement in the rectangle, whether tools will be brush or palette knife, shiny or matte finish…

All decisions affect the outcome and feel of the artwork.  These choices – i.e., the process – become mere means to an end.  The critical issue remains, “What is the goal?”

I always start with a quick cartoon on blank canvas. Expanding on that, I then add background color on the figure to integrate the figure with its surroundings, and spend the rest of my efforts working on an overall unified piece that results in a stand-alone, wow image never seen before.  In between sessions there is time to dry.  But, I find that overworking can kill an artwork, so less is more.

 

The Leslie Nolan Art Studio-Water Damage

Last month my studio experienced the dreaded “water damage,” resulting in the loss of lots of older artwork, ruined walls and equipment, and finally a month long rehabilitation/reconstruction project.  During this time, of course, no new artwork could be done.

Now, however, like a phoenix this studio has been transformed into an efficient, spacious workplace.  Forced to clean out billiard and ping pong tables, hiking/camping gear, canoe, skis, etc., I ultimately found breathing and thinking room.

So, while I don’t recommend water as a method of renewal, in this case the damage spurred some much needed change. Every once in a while clearing out the space one uses for inspiration can prove stimulating to creativity.

Below, some after photographs and one image of the space in a state of massive confusion while fresh wallboard replaces the water-logged stuff.   I am definitely now ready to start some new art pieces!

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