Why I Paint Figures — Bob

IMG_20180111_164212413.jpg

Washington DC artist Leslie Nolan’s “Bob” 18″x14″ acrylic on canvas

I spent 33 years doing national security work for the federal government, travelling and working abroad in unstable, sometimes unsafe locations.  These experiences continue to directly impact my figurative paintings.

As described by Associate Curator Erica Harrison, Greater Reston Arts Center, the figures “seem to be on the fringe of existence, evoking distant thoughts of fleeting memories or dreams.”  It’s inevitable that my life experiences would evoke a general vulnerability of humans, as well as a celebration of resilience and the will to survive.  I find that regardless of culture, education, ethnicity, and social status, people all over the world have the same needs and desires.  They want safety and security. They desire a better life for themselves and their children.  My artwork reflects this universal concern of modern life.

Place a human figure in an image and immediately the picture takes on relevance.  It becomes personal.  It suggests a narrative. It’s open to questions – who, what, where, why, when.  For me, evoking these feelings and questions transforms the image into a deeper exploration of what it means to be human.

 

 

 

 

In the Studio

IMG_20170926_140213_377

Washington DC Artist Leslie Nolan in the Studio

Making new paintings and enjoying the fall light coming in the studio windows. This fabulous sunny weather gives off an aura of well-being, which translates to lively, exciting work.

Forget painstaking, impeccably rendered images. I’m talking free-flowing gestures. Intuitive sweeps of the brush. It feels like endless possibilities.

Washington Post Reviews “Seduction”

EPSON MFP image

facebook_1502624410145

Washington DC Artist Leslie Nolan’s Red Man

Join me for a Gallery Talk Sunday, Sept 10 at Athenaeum, 2 pm, along with Erich Keel, PhD, formerly head of education at the Kreeger Museum and erudite/fascinating art historian.  Seduction closes Sept 17.

Seduction @ Athenaeum

gamechangerlesliebigpinkblog

Washington DC-artist Leslie Nolan with Pulled By What Would Be

In partnership with Susan Calloway Fine Arts of Washington DC, the Athenaeum Gallery in Alexandria VA presents Seduction, a solo exhibition of paintings by Leslie Nolan.

Seduction

Aug 10-Sept 17

Athenaeum Gallery

201 Prince St, Alexandria VA

Gallery Hours are Thurs, Fri and Sun, 12-4 pm; Sat, 1-4 pm

Opening Reception:  Sunday, Aug 13, 4-6 pm

Gallery Talk:  Sunday Sept 10, 2 pm

The Gallery Talk features the artist and Dr L Erich Keel, formerly Head of Education at the Kreeger Museum in Washington DC.

 

Seduction at Athenaeum

IMG_20170705_165150562_HDR

Leslie Nolan at Athenaeum

The Athenaeum Gallery in Alexandria VA, along with Susan Calloway Fine Arts of Washington DC (which represents me in this area), present Seduction, a solo exhibit featuring my newest paintings.

ATHENAEUM

201 Prince Street, Alexandria VA 703.548.0035 NVFAA.org

Seduction –Aug 10 – Sept 17

Opening reception Sunday Aug 13, 4-6 pm

Gallery Talk Sunday, Sept 10, 2 pm

The gallery talk will feature both me and Dr. L. Erich Keel.  Dr. Keel served as Head of Education for the Kreeger Museum until his retirement in 2013.  Currently he lectures on twentieth-century German art, leads art-themed study tours to Europe, and serves as a volunteer curator for the Arts Club of Washington exhibition program.  Keel earned a Ph.D. in Critical Theory from Emory University.

Gallery hours are Thursday Friday and Sunday from 12-4 pm;  Saturday from 1-4 pm.

 

Preparing for Solo at Athenaeum

IMG_20170429_111308082These two new paintings will be featured in my upcoming August 2017 solo exhibition – Seduction – at the Old Town Alexandria, Virginia Athenaeum Gallery.

Both pieces, 36″x60″ acrylic on canvas, feature a man with great dignity and power, yet the images are infused with color and an other-worldly feeling.  Ambiguity, uncertainty, perhaps fleeting glimpses of reality infuse these abstracted visuals of modern life.