LA Invitational at George Billis Gallery

 

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Corrected Vision 5, 20″x20″ acrylic on canvas, by Washington DC Artist Leslie M. Nolan

Just shipped this handsome guy to George Billis Gallery in the Culver City art district of Los Angeles for the LA Invitational.  I’m honored to be in this exhibit, curated by Tressa Wiliams, Gallery Director.  If you’re in the area, stop by and see the show.

By the way, George Billis Gallery is also in New York City, located in the heart of the Chelsea art district.

George Billis Gallery

2716 S. La Cienega Blvd, Los Angeles, CA

http://www.GeorgeBillis.com

Show Dates — July 28 – August 25, 2018

Opening Reception — Saturday, July 28, 6-8 pm  

Award Winner of Hill Center Galleries Regional Juried Exhibition

 

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Under Wraps 3, 36″x48″ acrylic on canvas, by Washington DC artist Leslie Nolan

Many, many thanks to juror Annette Polan for selecting this cute painting for the highly competitive regional exhibition on Capitol Hill and conferring it Third Place.  A renowned nationally-feted portrait artist, Annette knows her figures. She painted the official portrait of Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.   Thanks also to Exhibitions Director Nicky Cymrot and her staff for making this possible.

The exhibit closes September 23, so there’s plenty of time to drop by and catch the show:

Hill Center Galleries

at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave SE, Washington DC

http://www.hillcenterdc.org

 

Last Week of Flip Side

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Washington DC Artist Leslie Nolan in the Studio

Flip Side, my solo exhibit at Hill Center Gallery in the Old Naval Hospital, is on display through June 23.

Location:  921 Pennsylvania Ave SE, Washington DC.  http://www.hillcenterdc.org

Solo Exhibit at Hill Center

img_20180511_112854403Some images from my 17-painting solo exhibit Flip-Side at Hill Center Galleries. The show is up through June 23. http://www.hillcenter.orgimg_20180511_113003940_burst000_cover_top

Flip-Side at Hill Center Galleries

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Join me at my solo, Flip-Side, 17 new figurative paintings at Hill Center Galleries.  Located in the historic Old Naval Hospital, the building was constructed during the Civil War.  It’s a beautiful, stately structure on Capitol Hill at 921 Pennsylvania Ave NE, Washington DC. http://www.hillcenterdc.org.

Also, remember that Susan Calloway Fine Arts in the historic neighborhood of Georgetown represents me in Washington DC — 1643 Wisconsin Avenue, Washington DC.  http://www.callowayart.com

Getting Ready for Hill Center Solo Exhibit

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Karl, 30″x24″ acrylic on canvas, is one of 17 artworks that form Flip-Side, my upcoming solo exhibit at Hill Center Gallery on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.  Many thanks to Gallery Director Nicky Cymrot for the opportunity.

These abstracted figure paintings continue a theme I’ve been developing over the past several years – that is, depicting what is felt rather than what is seen.  Featuring ordinary people in states of vulnerability, confusion or courage, the paintings focus on moods as interpreted by facial and body language, vibrant color and bold brushwork.  There exists a public side that we present to the world, and a private flip-side that reflects doubt and turmoil. Loss of control frequently pervades, as though the subject has been taken outside his or her comfort zone.  Sounds like a modern, topical theme for today’s life, doesn’t it?

Flip-Side

On Exhibit May 3 – June 23, 2018

Opening Reception Wednesday, May 9, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Hill Center Gallery at the Old Naval Hospital

921 Pennsylvania Avenue NE, Washington DC

http://www.HillCenterDC.orginfo@hillcenterdc.org — 202.549.4172

Why I Paint Figures — Bob

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Washington DC artist Leslie Nolan’s “Bob” 18″x14″ acrylic on canvas

I spent 33 years doing national security work for the federal government, travelling and working abroad in unstable, sometimes unsafe locations.  These experiences continue to directly impact my figurative paintings.

As described by Associate Curator Erica Harrison, Greater Reston Arts Center, the figures “seem to be on the fringe of existence, evoking distant thoughts of fleeting memories or dreams.”  It’s inevitable that my life experiences would evoke a general vulnerability of humans, as well as a celebration of resilience and the will to survive.  I find that regardless of culture, education, ethnicity, and social status, people all over the world have the same needs and desires.  They want safety and security. They desire a better life for themselves and their children.  My artwork reflects this universal concern of modern life.

Place a human figure in an image and immediately the picture takes on relevance.  It becomes personal.  It suggests a narrative. It’s open to questions – who, what, where, why, when.  For me, evoking these feelings and questions transforms the image into a deeper exploration of what it means to be human.